comment FEEDBACK
notifications people person {{user_data.username}} Log out {{ snack_text }} Close
Picture of Alban Berg

About Twelve-tone technique

The twelve-tone technique—also known as dodecaphony, twelve-tone serialism, and (in British usage) twelve-note composition—is a method of musical composition first devised by Austrian composer Josef Matthias Hauer, who published his "law of the twelve tones" in 1919. In 1923, Arnold Schoenberg (1874–1951) developed his own, better-known version of 12-tone technique, which became associated with the "Second Viennese School" composers, who were the primary users of the technique in the first decades of its existence. The technique is a means of ensuring that all 12 notes of the chromatic scale are sounded as often as one another in a piece of music while preventing the emphasis of any one note through the use of tone rows, orderings of the 12 pitch classes. All 12 notes are thus given more or less equal importance, and the music avoids being in a key. Over time, the technique increased greatly in popularity and eventually became widely influential on 20th-century composers. Many important composers who had originally not subscribed to or even actively opposed the technique, such as Aaron Copland and Igor Stravinsky, eventually adopted it in their music. Schoenberg himself described the system as a "Method of composing with twelve tones which are related only with one another". It is commonly considered a form of serialism. Schoenberg's fellow countryman and contemporary Josef Matthias Hauer also developed a similar system using unordered hexachords or tropes—but with no connection to Schoenberg's twelve-tone technique. Other composers have created systematic use of the chromatic scale, but Schoenberg's method is considered to be historically and aesthetically most significant.


This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Twelve-tone technique , which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Hottest videos on mozaart right now

Stuck in the Middle by Tai Verdes
Stuck in the Middle
Tai Verdes
Then Leave (feat. Queendome Come) by Beatking, Queendome Come
Then Leave (feat. Queendome Come)
Beatking, Queendome Come
Stunnin' (feat. Harm Franklin) by Curtis Waters, Harm Franklin
Stunnin' (feat. Harm Franklin)
Curtis Waters, Harm Franklin
Hood Baby by KBFR
Hood Baby
KBFR
Volcano Man by Will Ferrell, My Marianne
Volcano Man
Will Ferrell, My Marianne
Hard For Me by Michele Morrone
Hard For Me
Michele Morrone
Hatchback by Cochise
Hatchback
Cochise
Como Llora by Juanfran
Como Llora
Juanfran
Registred Mozaart.com 2019
Previous skip_previous Play play_arrow Pause pause Next skip_next Share fa-share-alt Playlist queue_music